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Annotation of /hopm/trunk/doc/reference.conf

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Mon Dec 22 13:29:14 2014 UTC (7 years, 11 months ago) by michael
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- Update reference.conf

1 michael 5052 /*
2    
3 michael 5056 HOPM sample configuration
4 michael 5052
5     */
6    
7     options {
8     /*
9     * Full path and filename for storing the process ID of the running
10 michael 5056 * HOPM.
11 michael 5052 */
12 michael 5056 pidfile = "/some/path/hopm.pid";
13 michael 5052
14     /*
15     * How many seconds to store the IP address of hosts which are
16     * confirmed (by previous scans) to be secure. New users from these
17     * IP addresses will not be scanned again until this amount of time
18     * has passed. IT IS STRONGLY RECOMMENDED THAT YOU DO NOT USE THIS
19     * DIRECTIVE, but it is provided due to demand.
20     *
21     * The main reason for not using this feature is that anyone capable
22     * of running a proxy can get abusers onto your network - all they
23     * need do is shut the proxy down, connect themselves, restart the
24     * proxy, and tell their friends to come flood.
25 michael 5056 *
26 michael 5052 * Keep this directive commented out to disable negative caching.
27     */
28     # negcache = 3600;
29    
30     /*
31     * Amount of file descriptors to allocate to asynchronous DNS. 64
32 michael 5056 * should be plenty for almost anyone.
33 michael 5052 */
34     dns_fdlimit = 64;
35    
36     /*
37     * Put the full path and filename of a logfile here if you wish to log
38 michael 5056 * every scan done. Normally HOPM only logs successfully detected
39     * proxies in the hopm.log, but you may get abuse reports to your ISP
40     * about portscanning. Being able to show that it was HOPM that did
41 michael 5052 * the scan in question can be useful. Leave commented for no
42     * logging.
43     */
44     # scanlog = "/some/path/scan.log";
45     };
46    
47    
48     IRC {
49     /*
50     * IP to bind to for the IRC connection. You only need to use this if
51 michael 5056 * you wish HOPM to use a particular interface (virtual host, IP
52 michael 5052 * alias, ...) when connecting to the IRC server. There is another
53     * "vhost" setting in the scan {} block below for the actual
54     * portscans. Note that this directive expects an IP address, not a
55     * hostname. Please leave this commented out if you do not
56     * understand what it does, as most people don't need it.
57     */
58     # vhost = "0.0.0.0";
59    
60     /*
61 michael 5056 * Nickname for HOPM to use.
62 michael 5052 */
63 michael 5056 nick = "MyHopm";
64 michael 5052
65     /*
66 michael 5056 * Text to appear in the "realname" field of HOPM's /whois output.
67 michael 5052 */
68 michael 5056 realname = "Hybrid Open Proxy Monitor";
69 michael 5052
70     /*
71     * If you don't have an identd running, what username to use.
72     */
73 michael 5056 username = "hopm";
74 michael 5052
75     /*
76 michael 5056 * Hostname (or IP) of the IRC server which HOPM will monitor
77 michael 5052 * connections on.
78     */
79     server = "myserver.somenetwork.org";
80    
81     /*
82     * Password used to connect to the IRC server (PASS)
83     */
84     # password = "secret";
85    
86     /*
87 michael 5056 * Port of the above server to connect to. This is what HOPM uses to
88 michael 5052 * get onto IRC itself, it is nothing to do with what ports/protocols
89     * are scanned, nor do you need to list every port your ircd listens
90     * on.
91     */
92     port = 6667;
93    
94     /*
95     * Command to execute to identify to NickServ (if your network uses
96     * it). This is the raw IRC command text, and the below example
97     * corresponds to "/msg nickserv identify password" in a client. If
98     * you don't understand, just edit "password" in the line below to be
99 michael 5056 * your HOPM's nick password. Leave commented out if you don't need
100 michael 5052 * to identify to NickServ.
101     */
102 michael 5056 # nickserv = "NS IDENTIFY password";
103 michael 5052
104     /*
105 michael 5056 * The username and password needed for HOPM to oper up.
106 michael 5052 */
107 michael 5056 oper = "hopm operpass";
108 michael 5052
109     /*
110 michael 5056 * Mode string that HOPM needs to set on itself as soon as it opers
111 michael 5052 * up. This needs to include the mode for seeing connection notices,
112 michael 5056 * otherwise HOPM won't scan anyone (that's usually umode +c).
113 michael 5052 */
114 michael 5056 mode = "+c";
115 michael 5052
116     /*
117 michael 5056 * If this is set then HOPM will use it as an /away message as soon as
118 michael 5052 * it connects.
119     */
120     away = "I'm a bot. Your messages will be ignored.";
121    
122     /*
123 michael 5056 * Info about channels you wish HOPM to join in order to accept
124     * commands. HOPM will also print messages in these channels every
125     * time it detects a proxy. Only IRC operators can command HOPM to do
126     * anything, but some of the things HOPM reports to these channels
127     * could be soncidered sensitive, so it's best not to put HOPM into
128 michael 5052 * public channels.
129     */
130     channel {
131 michael 5056 /*
132     * Channel name. Local ("&") channels are supported if your ircd
133     * supports them.
134     */
135     name = "#hopm";
136 michael 5052
137 michael 5056 /*
138     * If HOPM will need to use a key to enter this channel, this is
139     * where you specify it.
140     */
141     # key = "somekey";
142 michael 5052
143 michael 5056 /*
144     * If you use ChanServ then maybe you want to set the channel
145     * invite-only and have each HOPM do "/msg ChanServ invite" to get
146     * itself in. Leave commented if you don't, or if this makes no
147     * sense to you.
148     */
149     # invite = "CS INVITE #hopm";
150 michael 5052 };
151    
152     /*
153     * You can define a bunch of channels if you want:
154     *
155     * channel { name = "#other"; }; channel { name="#channel"; }
156     */
157 michael 5056
158 michael 5052 /*
159     * connregex is a POSIX regular expression used to parse connection
160     * (+c) notices from the ircd. The complexity of the expression should
161     * be kept to a minimum.
162 michael 5056 *
163 michael 5052 * Items in order MUST be: nick user host IP
164     *
165 michael 5056 * HOPM will not work with ircds which do not send an IP in the
166 michael 5052 * connection notice.
167     *
168     * This is fairly complicated stuff, and the consequences of getting
169 michael 5056 * it wrong are the HOPM does not scan anyone. Unless you know
170 michael 5052 * absolutely what you are doing, please just uncomment the example
171     * below that best matches the type of ircd you use.
172     */
173     connregex = "\\*\\*\\* Notice -- Client connecting: ([^ ]+) \\(([^@]+)@([^\\)]+)\\) \\[([0-9\\.]+)\\].*";
174    
175     /*
176     * "kline" controls the command used when an open proxy is confirmed.
177     * We suggest applying a temporary (no more than a few hours) KLINE on the host.
178     *
179     * <WARNING>
180 michael 5056 * Make sure if you need to change this string you also change the
181     * kline command for every DNSBL you enable below.
182 michael 5052 *
183 michael 5056 * Also note that some servers do not allow you to include ':' characters
184     * inside the KLINE message (e.g. for a http:// address).
185 michael 5052 *
186     * Users rewriting this message into something that isn't even a valid
187     * IRC command is the single most common cause of support requests and
188     * therefore WE WILL NOT SUPPORT YOU UNLESS YOU USE ONE OF THE EXAMPLE
189     * KLINE COMMANDS BELOW.
190     * </WARNING>
191     *
192     * That said, should you wish to customise this text, several
193     * printf-like placeholders are available:
194     *
195     * %n User's nick
196     * %u User's username
197     * %h User's irc hostname
198     * %i User's IP address
199     *
200     */
201 michael 5056 kline = "KLINE *@%h :Open Proxy found on your host.";
202 michael 5052
203 michael 5056 /*
204     * An AKILL example for services with OperServ. Your HOPM must have permission to
205     * AKILL for this to work!
206     */
207     # kline = "OS AKILL +3h *@%h Open proxy found on your host.";
208 michael 5052
209     /*
210 michael 5056 * Text to send on connection, these can be stacked and will be sent in this order.
211 michael 5052 */
212 michael 5056 # perform = "TIME";
213 michael 5052 };
214    
215    
216     /*
217     * OPM Block defines blacklists and information required to report new proxies
218     * to a dns blacklist. DNS-based blacklists store IP addresses in a DNS zone
219     * file. There are several blacklist that list IP addresses known to be open
220     * proxies or other forms of IRC abuse. By checking against these blacklists,
221 michael 5056 * HOPMs are able to ban known sources of abuse without completely scanning them.
222 michael 5052 */
223    
224     OPM {
225     /*
226     * Blacklist zones to check IPs against. If you would rather not
227     * trust a remotely managed blacklist, you could set up your own, or
228     * leave these commented out in which case every user will be
229     * scanned. The use of at least one open proxy DNSBL is recommended
230 michael 5056 * however.
231     *
232     * Please check the policies of each blacklist you use to check you
233     * are comfortable with using them to block access to your server
234     * (and that you are allowed to use them).
235 michael 5052 */
236    
237     /* DroneBL - http://dronebl.org */
238     # blacklist {
239     # /* The DNS name of the blacklist */
240     # name = "dnsbl.dronebl.org";
241     #
242     # /*
243     # * There are only two values that are valid for this
244     # * "A record bitmask" and "A record reply"
245     # * These options affect how the values specified to reply
246     # * below will be interpreted, a bitmask is where the reply
247     # * values are 2^n and more than one is added up, a reply is
248     # * simply where the last octet of the IP is that number.
249     # * If you are not sure then the values set for dnsbl.dronebl.org
250     # * will work without any changes.
251     # */
252     # type = "A record reply";
253     #
254     # /* Kline types not listed in the reply list below.
255     # *
256     # * For DNSBLs that are not IRC specific and you just wish to kline
257     # * certain types this can be disabled.
258     # */
259     # ban_unknown = yes;
260     #
261     # /* The actual values returned by the dnsbl.dronebl.org blacklist
262     # * As documented at http://www.dronebl.org/howtouse.do */
263     # reply {
264     # 2 = "Sample";
265     # 3 = "IRC Drone";
266     # 4 = "Tor";
267     # 5 = "Bottler";
268     # 6 = "Unknown spambot or drone";
269     # 7 = "DDOS Drone";
270     # 8 = "SOCKS Proxy";
271     # 9 = "HTTP Proxy";
272     # 10 = "ProxyChain";
273     # 255 = "Unknown";
274     # };
275     #
276     # /* The kline message sent for this specific blacklist, remember to put
277     # * the removal method in this.
278     # */
279     # kline = "KLINE *@%h :You have a host listed in the DroneBL. For more information, visit http://dronebl.org/lookup_branded.do?ip=%i&network=Network";
280     # };
281    
282     # /* ircbl.ahbl.org - see http://ahbl.org/docs/ircbl
283     # * http://oldwww.temp.ahbl.org/docs/ircbl.php */
284     # blacklist {
285     # name = "ircbl.ahbl.org";
286     # type = "A record reply";
287     # ban_unknown = no;
288     # reply {
289     # 2 = "Open proxy";
290     # };
291     # kline = "KLINE *@%h :Listed in ircbl.ahbl.org. See http://ahbl.org/removals";
292     # };
293    
294     /* tor.dnsbl.sectoor.de - http://www.sectoor.de/tor.php */
295     # blacklist {
296     # name = "tor.dnsbl.sectoor.de";
297     # type = "A record reply";
298     # reply {
299     # 1 = "Tor exit server";
300     # };
301     # ban_unknown = no;
302     # kline = "KLINE *@%h :Tor exit server detected. See www.sectoor.de/tor.php?ip=%i";
303     # };
304    
305     /* rbl.efnet.org - http://rbl.efnet.org/ */
306     # blacklist {
307     # name = "rbl.efnet.org";
308     # type = "A record reply";
309     # reply {
310     # 1 = "Open proxy";
311     # 2 = "Trojan spreader";
312     # 3 = "Trojan infected client";
313     # 4 = "TOR exit server";
314     # 5 = "Drones / Flooding";
315     # };
316     # ban_unknown = yes;
317     # kline = "KLINE *@%h :Listed in rbl.efnet.org. See rbl.efnet.org/?i=%i";
318     # };
319    
320    
321     /* example: NJABL - please read http://www.njabl.org/use.html before
322     * uncommenting */
323     # blacklist {
324     # name = "dnsbl.njabl.org";
325     # type = "A record reply";
326     # reply {
327     # 9 = "Open proxy";
328     # };
329     # ban_unknown = no;
330     # kline = "KLINE *@%h :Open proxy found on your host, please visit www.njabl.org/cgi-bin/lookup.cgi?query=%i";
331     # };
332    
333     /*
334     * You can report the insecure proxies you find to a DNSBL also!
335     * The remaining directives in this section are only needed if you
336     * intend to do this. Reports are sent by email, one email per IP
337     * address. The format does support multiple addresses in one email,
338     * but we don't know of any servers that are detecting enough insecure
339     * proxies for this to be really necessary.
340     */
341    
342     /*
343     * Email address to send reports FROM. If you intend to send reports,
344     * please pick an email address that we can actually send mail to
345     * should we ever need to contact you.
346     */
347     # dnsbl_from = "mybopm@myserver.org";
348    
349     /*
350     * Email address to send reports TO.
351 michael 5056 * For example DroneBL:
352 michael 5052 */
353     # dnsbl_to = "bopm-report@dronebl.org";
354    
355     /*
356     * Full path to your sendmail binary. Even if your system does not
357     * use sendmail, it probably does have a binary called "sendmail"
358     * present in /usr/sbin or /usr/lib. If you don't set this, no
359     * proxies will be reported.
360     */
361     # sendmail = "/usr/sbin/sendmail";
362     };
363    
364    
365     /*
366     * The short explanation:
367     *
368     * This is where you define what ports/protocols to check for. You can have
369     * multiple scanner blocks and then choose which users will get scanned by
370     * which scanners further down.
371     *
372     * The long explanation:
373     *
374     * Scanner defines a virtual scanner. For each user being scanned, a scanner
375     * will use a file descriptor (and subsequent connection) for each protocol.
376     * Once connecting it will negotiate the proxy to connect to
377     * target_ip:target_port (target_ip MUST be an IP).
378     *
379     * Once connected, any data passed through the proxy will be checked to see if
380     * target_string is contained within that data. If it is the proxy is
381     * considered open. If the connection is closed at any point before
382     * target_string is matched, or if at least max_read bytes are read from the
383     * connection, the negotiation is considered failed.
384     */
385    
386     scanner {
387    
388     /*
389     * Unique name of this scanner. This is used further down in the
390     * user {} blocks to decide which users get affected by which
391     * scanners.
392     */
393     name="default";
394    
395     /*
396     * HTTP CONNECT - very common proxy protocol supported by widely known
397     * software such as Squid and Apache. The most common sort of
398     * insecure proxy and found on a multitude of weird ports too. Offers
399     * transparent two way TCP connections.
400     */
401     protocol = HTTP:80;
402     protocol = HTTP:8080;
403     protocol = HTTP:3128;
404     protocol = HTTP:6588;
405    
406     /*
407     * SOCKS4/5 - well known proxy protocols, probably the second most
408     * common for insecure proxies, also offers transparent two way TCP
409     * connections. Fortunately largely confined to port 1080.
410     */
411     protocol = SOCKS4:1080;
412     protocol = SOCKS5:1080;
413    
414     /*
415     * Cisco routers with a default password (yes, it really does happen).
416     * Also pretty much anything else that will let you telnet to anywhere
417     * else on the internet. Fortunately these are always on port 23.
418     */
419     protocol = ROUTER:23;
420    
421     /*
422     * WinGate is commercial windows proxy software which is now not so
423     * common, but still to be found, and helpfully presents an interface
424     * that can be used to telnet out, on port 23.
425     */
426     protocol = WINGATE:23;
427    
428     /*
429     * The HTTP POST protocol, often dismissed when writing the access
430     * controls for proxies, but sadly can still be used to abused.
431     * Offers only the opportunity to send a single block of data, but
432     * enough of them at once can still make for a devastating flood.
433     * Found on the same ports that HTTP CONNECT proxies inhabit.
434     *
435     * Note that if your ircd has "ping cookies" then clients from HTTP
436     * POST proxies cannot actually ever get onto your network anyway. If
437     * you leave the checks in then you'll still find some (because some
438 michael 5056 * people IRC from boxes that run them), but if you use HOPM purely as
439 michael 5052 * a protective measure and you have ping cookies, you need not scan
440     * for HTTP POST.
441     */
442     protocol = HTTPPOST:80;
443    
444     /*
445     * IP this scanner will bind to. Use this if you need your scans to
446 michael 5056 * come FROM a particular interface on the machine you run HOPM from.
447 michael 5052 * If you don't understand what this means, please leave this
448     * commented out, as this is a major source of support queries!
449     */
450     # vhost = "127.0.0.1";
451    
452     /* Maximum file descriptors this scanner can use. Remember that there
453     * will be one FD for each protocol listed above. As this example
454     * scanner has 8 protocols, it requires 8 FDs per user. With a 512 FD
455     * limit, this scanner can be used on 64 users _at the same time_.
456     * That should be adequate for most servers.
457     */
458     fd = 512;
459    
460     /*
461     * Maximum data read from a proxy before considering it closed. Don't
462     * set this too high, some people have fun setting up lots of ports
463     * that send endless data to tie up your scanner. 4KB is plenty for
464     * any known proxy.
465     */
466     max_read = 4096;
467    
468     /*
469     * Amount of time (in seconds) before a test is considered timed out.
470     * Again, all but the poorest slowest proxies will be detected within
471     * 30 seconds, and this helps keep resource usage low.
472     */
473     timeout = 30;
474    
475     /*
476     * Target IP to tell the proxy to connect to
477     *
478     * !!! THIS MUST BE CHANGED !!!
479     *
480     * You cannot instruct the proxy to connect to itself! The easiest
481     * thing to do would be to set this to the IP of your ircd and then
482     * keep the default target_strings.
483     *
484     * Please use an IP that is publically reachable from anywhere on the
485     * Internet, because you have no way of knowing where the insecure
486 michael 5056 * proxies will be located. Just because you and your HOPM can
487 michael 5052 * connect to your ircd on some private IP like 192.168.0.1, does not
488     * mean that the insecure proxies out there on the Internet will be
489     * able to. And if they never connect, you will never detect them.
490     *
491     * Remember to change this setting for every scanner you configure.
492     */
493 michael 5056 target_ip = "127.0.0.1";
494 michael 5052
495     /*
496     * Target port to tell the proxy to connect to. This is usually
497     * something like 6667. Basically any client-usable port.
498     */
499 michael 5056 target_port = 6667;
500 michael 5052
501     /*
502     * Target string we check for in the data read back by the scanner.
503     * This should be some string out of the data that your ircd usually
504     * sends on connect. The example below will work on most
505     * hybrid/bahamut ircds. Multiple target strings are allowed.
506     *
507     * NOTE: Try to keep the number of target strings to a minimum. Two
508     * should be fine. One for normal connections and one for throttled
509     * connections. Comment out any others for efficiency.
510     */
511    
512 michael 5056 /*
513     * Usually first line sent to client on connection to ircd.
514 michael 5052 * If your ircd supports a more specific line (see below),
515     * using it will reduce false positives.
516     */
517 michael 5056 target_string = ":server.yournetwork.org NOTICE AUTH :*** Looking up your hostname";
518 michael 5052
519 michael 5056 /*
520     * If you try to connect too fast, you'll be throttled by your own
521 michael 5052 * ircd. Here's what a hybrid throttle message looks like:
522     */
523     target_string = "ERROR :Your host is trying to (re)connect too fast -- throttled.";
524     };
525    
526 michael 5056
527 michael 5052 scanner {
528     name = "extended";
529    
530     protocol = HTTP:81;
531     protocol = HTTP:8000;
532     protocol = HTTP:8001;
533     protocol = HTTP:8081;
534    
535     protocol = HTTPPOST:81;
536     protocol = HTTPPOST:6588;
537     # protocol = HTTPPOST:4480;
538     protocol = HTTPPOST:8000;
539     protocol = HTTPPOST:8001;
540     protocol = HTTPPOST:8080;
541     protocol = HTTPPOST:8081;
542    
543     /*
544     * IRCnet have seen many socks5 on these ports, more than on the
545     * standard ports even.
546     */
547     protocol = SOCKS4:4914;
548     protocol = SOCKS4:6826;
549     protocol = SOCKS4:7198;
550     protocol = SOCKS4:7366;
551     protocol = SOCKS4:9036;
552    
553     protocol = SOCKS5:4438;
554     protocol = SOCKS5:5104;
555     protocol = SOCKS5:5113;
556     protocol = SOCKS5:5262;
557     protocol = SOCKS5:5634;
558     protocol = SOCKS5:6552;
559     protocol = SOCKS5:6561;
560     protocol = SOCKS5:7464;
561     protocol = SOCKS5:7810;
562     protocol = SOCKS5:8130;
563     protocol = SOCKS5:8148;
564     protocol = SOCKS5:8520;
565     protocol = SOCKS5:8814;
566     protocol = SOCKS5:9100;
567     protocol = SOCKS5:9186;
568     protocol = SOCKS5:9447;
569     protocol = SOCKS5:9578;
570    
571     /*
572     * These came courtsey of Keith Dunnett from a bunch of public open
573     * proxy lists.
574     */
575     protocol = SOCKS4:29992;
576     protocol = SOCKS4:38884;
577     protocol = SOCKS4:18844;
578     protocol = SOCKS4:17771;
579     protocol = SOCKS4:31121;
580    
581     fd = 400;
582    
583     /* If required you can add settings such as target_ip here
584     * they will override the defaults set in the first scanner
585     * for this and subsequent scanners defined in the config file
586     * This affects the following options:
587     * fd, vhost, target_ip, target_port, target_string, timeout and
588     * max_read.
589     */
590     };
591    
592    
593     /*
594     * User blocks define what scanners will be used to scan which hostmasks. When
595     * a user connects they will be scanned on every scanner {} (above) that
596     * matches their host.
597     */
598     user {
599     /*
600     * Users matching this host mask will be scanned with all the
601     * protocols in the scanner named.
602     */
603     mask = "*!*@*";
604     scanner = "default";
605     };
606    
607     user {
608 michael 5056 /*
609     * Connections without ident will match on a vast number of connections
610     * very few proxies run ident though
611     */
612 michael 5052 # mask = "*!~*@*";
613     mask = "*!squid@*";
614     mask = "*!nobody@*";
615     mask = "*!www-data@*";
616     mask = "*!cache@*";
617     mask = "*!CacheFlowS@*";
618     mask = "*!*@*www*";
619     mask = "*!*@*proxy*";
620     mask = "*!*@*cache*";
621    
622     scanner = "extended";
623     };
624    
625    
626     /*
627     * Exempt hosts matching certain strings from any form of scanning or dnsbl.
628 michael 5056 * HOPM will check each string against both the hostname and the IP address of
629 michael 5052 * the user.
630     *
631 michael 5056 * There are very few valid reasons to actually use "exempt". HOPM should
632 michael 5052 * never get false positives, and we would like to know very much if it does.
633 michael 5056 * One possible scenario is that the machine HOPM runs from is specifically
634 michael 5052 * authorized to use certain hosts as proxies, and users from those hosts use
635 michael 5056 * your network. In this case, without exempt, HOPM will scan these hosts,
636 michael 5052 * find itself able to use them as proxies, and ban them.
637     */
638     exempt {
639     mask = "*!*@127.0.0.1";
640     };

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